Anti-discrimination and bullying page 1 of 6

53 articles are classified in All Articles > Workplace policy > Anti-discrimination and bullying


Company reforms ways after criminal record discrimination

A company that withdrew an offer of employment when it discovered the potential employee's criminal record has paid her $2500 compensation and revised its global recruitment and HR practices, after the AHRC found it discriminated against her.

Anti-social media driving workplace harassment: AHRI chair

Social media "moves the dial" on harassing workplace behaviour and will contribute to more litigation flowing through to the courts, according to Australian Human Resources Institute chair Peter Wilson.

Put harassment regulation on same footing as OHS laws: Expert

A leading workplace academic has called on legislators to consider a UK parliamentary inquiry's recommendation to impose a legal obligation to protect workers from sexual harassment, with breaches resulting in "substantial financial penalties".

Duty of care didn't include foreseeing attack: FWC

The FWC has rejected a dismissed employee's contention that a company's duty of care extended to anticipating that he would act in a violent and threatening manner towards a co-worker.

Self-represented CEO highlights futility of own case

The pitfalls of self-representation have been highlighted by an FWC full bench that found it would be "futile" to hear a former chief executive's anti-bullying case because his notice of appeal "expressly" indicated he was seeking an unnecessary order.

FWC backs ejection of "sexist", "exclusionary" overseer

The FWC has upheld Toyota's sacking of a supervisor for improperly exercising his power, finding his "benevolent sexism" and inappropriate behaviour towards a group of young, female fixed-term contractors created a weird, dirty and unhealthy environment.

Qantas worker's "fundamental" conduct breach justified sacking: FWC

In the wake of the public spotlight on the Qantas "inclusive language" guidelines, one of its baggage handlers has failed to convince the FWC that tearing a colleague's shirt, shoving him against a locker and telling him to f-ck off back to his country were not sackable offences but rather a bit of "argy bargy" between friends, consistent with the workplace culture.


Social media post had sufficient nexus with workplace: FWC

In an important ruling on out-of-hours conduct, the FWC has found that an employer didn't need to receive a complaint before investigating then sacking a worker for sharing a p--nographic video via social media with friends who included 19 male and female work colleagues.